Monday, July 3, 2017

"Retaking Pervaiske" The Army of Orphans Book Two by F. B. Veneziano


                                                                                             




"We all had our stories, Anton and I, along with our older sister, Irina, were given to the state by our father, an abusive drunk, and declared social orphans. Irina ran away with her boyfriend, Paul Orlik, while Anton and I were sent to a skolainternat, a boarding school for orphans. Dmitry and Liza came home from school one day and found an empty house. They had been abandoned. Misha'a parents were killed in a bus crash. Natalia's mother left at the hospital when she was born. And little Anna went shopping with her mother one day. She was told to wait next to the bread while her mother picked up a few things. Her mother never came back."


It's the year 2048, 3 years since Anton, Irina, and Alex were first left in the orphanage. Picking up where the first book "Army of Orphans" left off, we find the kids living on their own. They've left the orphanage and are in hiding. 

They are helping people escape the oppressive state in which they live, Pervaiske, Ekrunia in Eastern Europe. Now they are known as the "Army of Orphans." With other children and the help of resistance fighters, they are trying to help others escape. It's been 30 years since the rebellion first began. Can Pervaiske ever be returned to its once peaceful state? 

I was glad to revisit Alex and his siblings. I wanted to know if they'd found a home or peace for that matter. Right off in the first chapter there is a life altering event for the three. 

Working with adults in a resistance group, it's a way of someone looking out for them, and at the same time using them for dangerous missions. It's getting more dangerous when the next mission involves weapons being held by the government. With family involved, the orphans take on some scary missions. 

The story is fast paced and engrossing. Plenty of action. You can't help but root for these children, and at the same time want some one to swoop in and save them all. 

There are real orphans in European countries who live like this, or something similar to the survivalist existence. I can't imagine any country ignoring the plight of these children. How does one overlook such a thing? The casualties of war torn countries. 

While this could be read as a stand alone, you really would benefit to read the the first book in this series, "The Army of Orphans: The Beginning." It is a trilogy, so there will be another book to follow. Looking forward to another story by this author. The ending will leave you wanting more!


Thank you F. B. Veneziano